Raw Generation Review (Including Skinny Cleanse and Charcoal Water)

Raw Generation Review

In the past few years, the concept of using certain foods to detoxify and cleanse our bodies has rapidly grown in popularity. As a consumer, you may be wondering does it work? Can food really cleanse our body and does it have any long-term effects? How do the cleanse company’s claims stack up against the science? 

In this article, I’m going to focus on the juice cleanse and the of the use of activated charcoal for detoxification. In particular, I’ll review Raw Generation Skinny Cleanse as well as their Charcoal Water. Both products promote weight loss and a system cleanse.

The basic science behind detox

First, I want to discuss some basic science. Free radicals are molecules in the human body that are formed from many different biological and environmental factors such as pollution, smoking, and UV radiation. These free radical molecules have the potential to cause damage to a cell. Science has taught us that antioxidant molecules sourced from certain vitamins can bind with free radicals and protect our cells from damage. 

With this in mind, it’s important to note that humans have an incredibly complex immune system. Our bodies are not designed to rely on diet to “cleanse” ourselves. Nutrition does support the organs that detoxify our bodies. However, ultimately, our lungs, kidneys, liver, and lymphatic system all filter and remove toxins from our bodies.

The best thing we can do for our body is to care for the health of these organs. One way to do so is by including a healthy and balanced diet full of vitamins and minerals. Fresh 100% juice does contain some of these vitamins and minerals.

What is activated charcoal?

Activated charcoal is a black powder that is activated when heated to very high temperatures. The powder may contain a variety of substances such as wood/sawdust, coconut shells, or olive pits. It binds through direct contact with certain food or medications in the stomach and gastrointestinal tract.

In medical settings, activated charcoal can be used to inhibit the absorption of certain medications after an overdose. The US Pharmaceutical Corporation states that it lacks evidence to work as a digestive aid. It is not effective in removing nutrients, alcohol, or medications that have already been absorbed by the bloodstream. 

I frequently hear people ask, “how do fruit and vegetable juices fit into a cleanse? Does activated charcoal detoxify your body?” You can find the answers to these questions and more in this review.

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Raw Generation Review
Source: rawgeneration.com

The Raw Generation Skinny Cleanse

The first of the two products I tried is the Raw Generation Skinny Cleanse. This is a 3-7 day cleanse and recommends consumption as follows (at the choice of the user).

  • Sweet Greens – 2 bottles per day
  • Citrus Carrot – 1 bottle per day
  • Sweet Roots – 1 bottle per day
  • Cool Greens – 1 bottle per day
  • Sweet-Tart Greens – 1 bottle per day

The total nutrition for each day of the skinny cleanse approximately breaks down to:

  • 710 calories
  • 160 grams of carbohydrate (approximately 90% of calories come from carbohydrates)
  • 10 grams of protein

Furthermore, the day provides about 70% of the daily recommended intake of potassium, 32% of calcium, and 55% of iron. 

Claims of the Skinny Cleanse

The Raw Generation Skinny Cleanse was marketed to provide the following user benefits:

  1. Lose weight
  2. Cleanse your body
  3. Get more energy
  4. Jumpstart a healthier diet

Meredith drinking Raw Generation

My experience with the Skinny Cleanse

Consuming a hypocaloric diet for 3-7 days will likely result in weight loss for most participants, I would not argue that claim. I would like to point out that the juices do not meet protein needs. Weight loss is a combination of fat and muscle, and the scale may drop quickly due to the fact that the consumer is not taking in significant protein (to build muscle and protect tissue) during this time.

As I mentioned earlier in this article, fruits and vegetables are only a catalyst to cleansing our bodies, and the other claims would be up to the consumer.

I would rate the overall taste of the juices as a 9 out of 10. I had no trouble drinking all of the juices and the only juice I smelled more vegetables than fruit was the sweet-tart green juice.

Purchase the Raw Generation Skinny Cleanse on the company’s website or Amazon

Raw Generation Lemon Charcoal Water
Source: rawgeneration.com

The Raw Generation Charcoal Water

The second of the two products I tried is the Raw Generation Charcoal Water. Unlike the Skinny Cleanse, this product does not consist of different drinks and should only be consumed once a day. Like water, it does not have a significant nutrition profile. 

Claims of the Charcoal Water

The Raw Generation Charcoal Water was marketed to provide the following user benefits:

  1. Remove toxins from your system
  2. Reduce bloating
  3. Re-energize your body
  4. Hangover recovery

My experience with the Charcoal Water 

In response to these claims, as discussed previously, activated charcoal can bind only to food and medications in your stomach and small intestine prior to absorption into the bloodstream. Everything that we eat isn’t toxic. In fact, most things that we eat give nutrition to our bodies! The Charcoal Water has a warning not to consume with medications.

At this time, we don’t have enough evidence to claim that charcoal water reduces bloating or re-energizes our body. Activated charcoal does not bind with substances already absorbed. Consuming the water for hydration may help with hangover recovery, but the charcoal itself is not the cure for a hangover.

Regarding consumption of the activated charcoal water, I would rate the taste as excellent! The charcoal in the water did not affect the texture too much and the water was honestly refreshing!

My personal opinion is that I don’t think it’s necessarily harmful to drink and enjoy. However, there is not enough research to support the claims of the health benefits.

Purchase the Raw Generation Charcoal Water on the company’s website

Is Raw Generation right for you?

Pros

  • 100% fresh fruit and vegetable juice can be incorporated into a healthy diet and provide valuable nutrition.
  • Drinking more water is a healthy habit to establish.
  • All of the products I tried were delicious!

Cons

  • Drinking only juice for a period of time with the intention of cleansing the body can cause electrolyte imbalances.
  • Ultimately, we lack research on the efficacy of the claims of consumer charcoal water.

Drinking Raw Generation on the Patio

How much do Raw Generation drinks cost? 

Raw Generation has a number of cleanses, juices, and smoothies available. For pricing on each individual option, click here.

In regards to the products I tried, the Skinny Cleanse is $99 on both the company’s website and Amazon. An 18 pack of Charcoal Water is $59 on the company’s website.

Personally, since it’s less expensive, I tend to purchase 100% juice from the grocery store. However, the quality of Raw Generation juices is higher than grocery store juices and is $2-3 less expensive per serving than juice from some of the local juice shops near me.

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Final thoughts

Juice cleanses are considered incomplete nutrition. If you are consuming only juice for 3-7 days, your diet will be deficient in protein as well as vital nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. While this is not meant to be a sustainable nutrition plan, our bodies and immune systems are very dependent on protein to function.

Another concern to note is that these juices (and most juices) contain zero sodium. Personally, I have a hard time recommending absolutely zero sodium consumption for any period of time over 24 hours. Everybody functions differently, but some people are more sensitive to sodium imbalances than others, and hyponatremia (a dangerously low blood sodium level) is a significant concern. Specific to Raw Generation, as their name states, the juices are raw – not pasteurized. Please use caution if you have a compromised immune system.

Despite the popularity of cleanses and products designed to detoxify our bodies, I am wary of their claims. Fresh fruit juice can certainly be incorporated into a balanced diet, but I am always an advocate for sustainable eating. We support our immune system more by consuming our nutrients in the form of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and quality fats! And remember: we don’t detox our bodies – they detox us!

Have you tried Raw Generation before? What did you think of it? Share your feedback in the comments below 🙂

Raw Generation Review
Overall
4.3
  • Cost
  • Taste
  • Nutrition
  • Effectiveness
Comments Rating 0 (0 reviews)

Summary

Raw Generation provides consumers with cleanses, juices, and smoothies available online for delivery anywhere in US. Despite the popularity of cleanses and products designed to detoxify our bodies, I am wary of their cleansing claims. Regardless, their products are delicious and do provide nutritional value.

Pros

  • 100% fresh fruit and vegetable juice can be incorporated into a healthy diet and provide valuable nutrition.
  • Drinking more water is a healthy habit to establish.
  • All of the products I tried were delicious!

Cons

  • Drinking only juice for a period of time with the intention of cleansing the body can cause electrolyte imbalances.
  • Ultimately, we lack research on the efficacy of the claims of consumer charcoal water.

Sources:

  • Raw Generation
  • USP DI: drug information for the health care professional, 22nd ed. Greenwood Village, CO: Micromedex; 2002;1:848-51.
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Meredith Byrne, RD, LDN, CNSC
Meredith Byrne is a clinical dietitian at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, NC. Her focus is on cardiac, maternal, and oncology medical nutrition therapy, as well as disease-preventative nutrition. Meredith graduated from Virginia Tech with a degree in dietetics in 2006. She also completed her dietetic internship at Virginia Tech. Outside of work, she is an avid runner, backpacker, and loves international travel. Meredith lived overseas in eastern Asia for a year before moving to Charlotte in 2008 and had the opportunity to spend several weeks in Burkina Faso to help diagnose and treat pediatric malnutrition in 2013. She has completed six marathons including Boston and NYC. Meredith is passionate about helping others adapt their lifestyle to improve their health and knowledge of nutrition.

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